LIGHTEN THEIR DARKNESS

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LIGHTEN THEIR DARKNESS

The Evangelical Mission to Working-Class London, 1828-1860

A comprehensive and compelling study of the church and the complexities of nineteenth-century London. Challenging our understanding of the culture in working London at this time, Lewis presents a well-structured and illuminated work that contributes substantially to the study of evangelicalism and mission in nineteenth-century Britain.

CONTENTS

  1. The Divided Evangelicals

  2. Evangelicalism in Flux: Changes in the Evangelical Theology and Strategy of Evangelism

  3. New approaches to Urban Evangelism

  4. The influence of Issues of Church and State on Pan-Evangelicalism During Peel's Second Administration

  5. The Scripture Readers' Association: A Denominational Challenge to Pan-Evangelical Evangelism

  6. From door to door: Men, Methods, and Response

  7. Evangelism, Social Concern, and Social Control

  8. Setbacks and Advances for Pan-Evangelicalism, 1846-1852

  9. Specialization in Evangelism

  10. New incentives to Pan-Evangelical Unity

  11. Bishop Tait's Episcopacy, 1856-1860: Further Advances for Pan-Evangelical Evangelism

  12. Epilogue: The Significance of the Evangelical Urban Mission.

WHAT SCHOLARS ARE SAYING ...

Sheridan Gilley

Department of Theology, University of Durham

"This splendid work has a much wider theme than its title suggests.  It is, quite simply, the most sophisticated monograph which we possess on English evangelicalism, both within the Church of England and outside it."  

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Marc Baer 

Christian Scholar's Review 

"... a book which should be read by all those interested in the relationship between classes in Victorian cities ... Lewis has described 'the most influential religious crusades to affect the Victorian working classes.'"

FULL LENGTH REVIEWS OF THE BOOK

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1.    Gilley, Sheridan. “Lighten Their Darkness: The Evangelical Mission to Working-Class London, 1828-1860.” The Journal of Ecclesiastical History 39, no. 4 (October 1988): 624–25.

2.    Crider, Donald M. “Lighten Their Darkness: The Evangelical Mission to Working-Class London, 1828-1860.” Review of Religious Research 30, no. 1 (September 1988): 86–87.

3.  Paz, D G. “Lighten Their Darkness: The Evangelical Mission to Working-Class London, 1828-1860.” Anglican and Episcopal History 58, no. 4 (December 1989): 539–42.

"Donald M. Lewis' study is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of Anglicanism in the nineteenth century."  

 

4.  Baer, Marc. “Lighten Their Darkness: The Evangelical Mission to Working-Class London, 1828-1860.” Christian Scholar’s Review 18, no. 4 (June 1989): 388–95.

5.   Rice, Robert J. “Lighten Their Darkness: The Evangelical Mission to Working-Class London, 1828-1860.” Fides et Historia 20, no. 2 (June 1988): 59–60.

"The portrait that Lewis has given is not the traditional Victorian church as edifice alone, but also the experimental and evangelistic church which struggled amidst the interplay of forces representing Christ and culture in Victorian Britain."    

 

6.   Sachs, William L. “Lighten Their Darkness: The Evangelical Mission to Working-Class London, 1828-1860.” Church History 57, no. 3 (September 1988): 388–89.​

"The complexity of the era, with constantly shifting religious and political factions, requires that the historian clarify intricate patterns of cause and effect.  Lewis meets the challenge well ....  The result is new light on the 'social control' thesis.  Lewis demonstrates that while Evangelicals perceived the threat of slum violence, they were more interested in saving souls and conveying moral example than in achieving social control."

 

7.  Atherstone, Andrew. “Lighten Their Darkness: The Evangelical Mission to Working-Class London, 1828-1860.” Churchman 115, no. 3 (2001): 262–63.

"The herculean labours of Lord Shaftesbury apart, little has been written of evangelical ministry amongst the urban poor of the nineteenth century.  Don Lewis' ground-breaking study, with its analysis of often-overlooked personalities and organizations, helps to redress the balance and points to an alternative approach to that of the later ritualist 'slum priests.'  .... Lewis has produced a first-class monograph ..."

 8.  Bartlett, Alan. “Lighten Their Darkness: The Evangelical Mission to Working-Class London, 1828-1860.” Theology 105, no. 823 (January 2002): 83–84.

"It is a meticulously researched, well-located and intelligently written account of the pan-evangelical mission in London in the first half of the nineteenth century."